Currently on

In Your Backyard

Until 20 December 2018
  • The exhibition will be on display in The Department of Art History Gallery in the O'Shaughnessy Educational Center (OEC), St. Paul Campus of the University of St. Thomas

    Free and open to the public.

    Viewing hours:
    9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday
    9 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday
    9 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday
    Noon-6 p.m. Sunday

    Parking is available in the Anderson Parking Facility, corner of Grand and Cretin avenues.
    Gallery location and parking directions: www.stthomas.edu/campusmaps

    The O'Shaughnessy Educational Center is handicap accessible. For accessibility requests: (651) 962-6315

In Your Backyard, an exhibition by Katayoun Amjadi.

Exhibition reception:
Sept. 14, 2018
6:00-8:00 p.m.

Featuring work from the Domestic Affairs series, this exhibition investigates the idea of home in body, structure, and land. It explores the culturally embedded promise of security and hope engendered in the archetypal house. Offering a conceptual topography of "place." Domestic Affairs acts as a kind of domestirc archeology.

About the artist:

Katayoun Amjadi is an Iranian-born ceramicist and sculptor. In her artworks, she often considers the social aspirations that continually construct binaries which shape our perceptions of Self and Other, such as religion, gender, politics and nationalist ideologies. Katayoun is interested in blurring these boundaries to create a balanced hybrid style both in life and art. While cherishing the idiosyncrasies of her cultural heritage that have hitherto shaped her sense of self, she tries to make sense of the emotional turmoil involved in reconstructing a new hyphenated identity as an Iranian-American. The main source of inspiration behind her work comes from the simplest and earliest surviving man-made forms, iconic cultural images, and pre-historic artifacts. her art is an attempt to understand the relationship between past and present, tradition and modernity, and individual versus collective identity, as well as to spur discussion about our understanding of time and the tangled roots of our histories.

Photo courtesy of Katayoun Amjadi.